An Interesting Find

I stumbled across this flower yesterday whilst on my way to (yet another 🙂 ) Wheatfield. It was situated in a field where horses have been kept in the past, but which is currently full of wildflowers and long grasses.

On the way back home I decided to stop and photograph some of the interesting wildflowers in this field, when this flower caught my eye. It was the only one of its type in the whole field which aroused even more curiosity. Photographs were particular difficult to take yesterday as the wind was extraordinarily strong but I managed to take a few for identification purposes. It didn’t take too long – via the internet – to discover that it was a wild orchid – a Pyramidal orchid or Anacamptis Pyramidalis. I read that it’s not one of the rarer types but can be found in various sites across England and Wales. It looks as if it is starting to fade, as the lower petals have turned brown – in a week or so it will have disappeared altogether.

I’d never really taken an interest in these plants before and knew very little about them. I found out fairly recently that people go on the look-out for wild orchids but it had never occurred to me that I might stumble across one – I wouldn’t have known what one might look like, although there are lots of different types. It has certainly aroused a bit of curiosity in me now and I’ll be on the look-out myself.

This particular orchid can be found in grassy places – particularly in chalky areas, and is the County Flower of the Isle of Wight. Orchids have a quite complicated relationship with fungi and this species needs a specific fungus in the soil in order to bloom.

References:

http://www.plantlife.org.uk/wild_plants/plant_species/pyramidal_orchid/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/uk/indepth/where-to-see-orchids.shtml

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8 thoughts on “An Interesting Find

    • Thanks Patti. Yesterday the wind was really strong and it was a challenge to get anything in focus. I’ve noticed, though, that even in the strongest wind, there is usually a ‘sweet spot’ when it will stop briefly – but you have to be quick!

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  1. Great shot! We need to allow more ‘wild places’ to be, for gems like this to flourish. Even suburban gardens need a little ‘wild’ corner, to keep the Spirit alive.

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    • Thank you eremophila! I completely agree. You can tell this particular field hadn’t had weedkiller anywhere near it – the wildflowers, some photos of which I’ll be posting, were abundant and healthy. We have areas in the garden, too, which are left to do their own thing and the poppies and forget me nots seed all over the place!

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  2. Love this flower. It reminds me of the phlox that blooms here. The Lady’s Slipper on my blog today is also from the orchid family and is sought after much like you described for this flower. Every day that I learn something new is a good day. Love learning about a new flower.

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    • Thank you Jeanne. I didn’t know the Lady’s Slipper was from the orchid family – I don’t think I’ve seen one here. The one featured in your post is a beauty! It is really good to learn about new flowers – I’ve realised there’s so much I don’t know!

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